Tag Archives: Vancouver startup lawyer

US and Canada – similar countries, similar privacy laws… right? Wrong.

We are often engaged to review Privacy Policies from a U.S. and Canadian legal perspective.  In many cases these Privacy Policies were drafted by Canadian counsel without considering the laws of the client’s major market, the U.S.  The privacy laws of Canada and the U.S. are quite different and a failure to comply with U.S. privacy law can have enormous financial implications.  Accordingly, it is critical that Canadian companies ensure that their Privacy Policies are compliant on both sides of the border.

Below we detail three common privacy law issues that Canadian companies have when entering the US market.

1. The US is far bigger and more complex than Canada

In Canada, with a couple of exceptions, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) covers most privacy law issues in the commercial sphere.  Conversely, in the U.S., companies must comply with several different federal privacy laws, as well as state laws, the latter playing a major role in privacy protection.  This means that companies need to worry about complying with the privacy laws of all 50 states as well as several federal laws.

2. Same words, different meanings

Although both countries write their laws in English (In Canada – en Français aussi), words can have varying meanings under the law.  In privacy law in particular, certain key concepts are very different between Canadian and U.S. privacy laws, and companies that ignore these differences open themselves up to huge liability.

For example, the term personal information, at the core of privacy law in both countries, has different meanings in both countries and in the US there is no standard definition from one law to the next, or one state to the next. This means that while you might be compliant in Canada with the current way that you collect data from customers, the exact same data collection practice may be non-compliant in the US.

Other major privacy law concepts that differ in the US include: privacy of children under 13 years old, standards for “consent” and “breach”, rules for third-party access to personal information and jurisdiction issues.

3. Fines are far greater in the US

The price to pay for not complying with US privacy laws is far greater than not complying with Canadian privacy laws. For example, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC), the Canadian privacy law enforcement body, does not have the authority to fine companies for most privacy law violations.

In the US, by contrast, recent fines imposed by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and sister body, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), consistently are in the million-dollar range and even up to $25 million in some cases.  Even simple violations such as gathering temporary personal information of children prior to getting parental consent can garner fines of up to a million dollars.  And be aware, the first piece of evidence that the FTC will use to see if a company is complying with US privacy law, is its online privacy policy. If you haven’t changed your privacy policy from a Canadian law compliant privacy policy to a cross-border compliant privacy policy, you are putting your company at huge risk.

Canada’s population is 1/10 that of the U.S.  For business, this means that most Canadian companies are going to look to the U.S. for revenue generation and in the process create exposure to U.S. laws, including privacy laws.  It’s critical that companies stay on top of their exposure to U.S. laws and engage legal counsel to ensure that their operations are fully compliant.

Our Most Popular Posts of 2018

With 2018 coming to a close we’ve decided to look back at our most popular blog posts of 2018.   Interestingly, all of these posts are on the subject of capital raising/financing, which should be of no surprise to anyone who works in the technology sector!  Now, onto our most popular posts from 2018:

1.  Priced Rounds

In our most popular post we discussed the benefits to priced financing rounds, rather than convertible instruments, for early-stage financing rounds.  We also cautioned that some investors prefer convertible instruments and others will reject a priced round valuation but accept the same valuation (or higher) as the cap on a convertible instrument.   At the end of 2019, I still prefer priced rounds for early-stage investments but only if a Common share is on offer.   I am not fond of preferred share priced rounds prior to a company’s Series A financing (I’ve seen this more than normal in 2018) as this is too early a point in a company’s life for such a complex financing structure and the additional restrictions that often follow.

2.  Things Every Startup Should Know Before its First Financing

In the runner-up post, we laid out four things every startup should know before embarking on its first financing: (1) know your investment structure; (2) have your investment documents ready; (3) don’t treat investor interest as commitment; and (4) be realistic in the timeline for closing the investment round.  I’ll add a fifth: know all your outstanding equity obligations and clean them up before starting the round.  Put another way – all those equity offers you wrote yourself can’t be ignored and need to be cleaned up before the first financing begins.

3.  Video Game Profit Sharing Structures

Finally, in third place, was our post detailing three common structures for video game studio profit sharing: (1) draft a profit sharing agreement; (2) create a separate company for each game; or (3) issue shares to profit share participants.  While clients came to us with numerous structures for profit sharing in 2018, all went the profit sharing agreement route due to its flexibility.

That’s it for 2018.  Stop by again in 2019 for more posts on the law of startups and video game studios, from a Canadian and US perspective.

Things Every Startup Should Know Before its First Financing

Startups often email me to assist with a financing expected to close a few days later.  Eager to get the deal going, I ask about deal structure, such as type of investment, investor rights and size of round, only to learn that structure has yet to be determined and no firm commitments have been made by investors.  While there is nothing wrong with these details being TBD, it benefits startups, their investors and legal counsel to fix as many deal terms before expectations of closing take root as until the above is set in stone, there is not deal.

Before beginning your first fundraising round, consider the following:

  1.  Know your structure.  Fixing the structure for your investment round is critical and shows investors that the company is sophisticated.  Options include a priced round, convertible notes and SAFEs.  There’s nothing worse than pitching to an interested investor and being unable to answer questions about the round’s structure.
  2. Have your Documents Ready.  Be ready to close your lead investor quickly if they are ready to move forward with the investment.  While investment documents may be negotiated further, having the documents ready shows professionalism and speeds the transaction toward close.
  3. Don’t treat Interest as Commitment.  Until investors move beyond expressing interest and into reviewing and negotiating deal documents there is little merit to their interest.  In my experience, converting investor interest into investor commitment is much more challenging than expected and you don’t want to plan the company’s direction over the next year based off expressed interest only to find out that you can close 1/2 the amount expected.
  4. Be Realistic in Closing Timeline.  Attempting to close a round in a few days only happens if the above points have been addressed by the company.  Legal counsel can prepare documents as quickly as the client requires but investors won’t move quickly until they know the investment structure and previously received draft documentation.  With this in mind, set a realistic closing timeline.

Closing your first financing is daunting.  By keeping in mind structure, documentation, investor commitments and setting realistic closing time-frames you will put your startup in a better position to successfully close the round.

The Two Questions I ask new Startups and Studios

Each week I meet with prospective clients that are excited to be launching a new startup or video game studio.  Regardless of the differences between these clients, I inevitably end up asking two important questions at the start of every meeting:

1.  Have you incorporated?

Many clients incorporate without legal counsel, which I have no problem with.  However, by incorporating without a lawyer, prospective clients are often left with a few problems that I am attempting to unearth and that I know will need to be remedied:

A. The company’s paperwork is incomplete.  While a company exists once the filings are made with the state/province/federal government (if a federal, Canadian company), there are a number of resolutions, registers, receipts and other documentation that a company requires in order to have a complete minute book.  The preparation of the foregoing is the bulk of a lawyer’s work incorporating a company and will need to be prepared, especially if the company aims to raise capital as this documentation will be requested as part of standard due diligence.

B.  Too few shares were issued.  If you incorporated a company with 1, 10 or 100 shares, too few shares were issued and should be split or additional shares issued.  This avoids fractional shareholding in the future (imagine offering someone .25% and 10 shares are issued to date) and also makes equity offers to prospective employees more appealing (10,000 shares appear more attractive than 1 share, even if the same percentage ownership results).

C.  Too many share classes created or the wrong share classes created.  I always ask clients their reasons for a particular share class as both client and lawyer should understand the reasons behind the company’s structure.  Since most startups are incorporated with a single, common, share class, I push prospective clients to explain and even justify other classes.  Additionally, if a preferred share class exists, what are the rights and restrictions associated with this class?  Inevitably, no preferred rights and restrictions were specified,requiring the creation of these rights or restrictions or, more likely, deleting the preferred share class.

2.  Have you Transferred IP to the Company?

Clients mistakenly assume that the company they incorporate automatically owns the intellectual property they create.  While someone may be a shareholder (even the sole shareholder) or a director, this does not automatically transfer ownership of intellectual property created by such person(s) to the company.  Indeed, without a contractor, employment or assignment agreement in place, each founder remains the owner of the intellectual property they create.  As a result, the company may not own a core asset and cannot be in a position to license that asset to third parties.  Additionally, by asking this question I am often told about contractors who created intellectual property for a founder or the company without an agreement in place, which will also need to be corrected.

Based on these two questions, I am often able to obtain a full picture of a company and its history and put in place the key documents required to address any issues unearthed.   If you are embarking on a new venture be sure to keep these two questions in mind – doing so may prevent future legal headaches (and fees).  Or, you could read my suggestions on corporate structure and IP assignments here and here.